Monteriggioni

Siena

2017/09/09 - Written by Nicoletta Monciaro and Mario Salvini
SHARE THIS ARTICLE
A few kilometres North of Siena, one will encounter this city on the road in from Florence.

A square, a hamlet, a few vegetable gardens: all of it contained in the most suggestive example of defence walls one can imagine. They call it "la Corona" (the crown): those who have good memory will remember the old 100 liras. As a matter of fact, it was taken as a model for the crown that wreathed Italy's head on the old coin.

The fourteen towers, built between 1212 and 1219, represent Siena's attempt to stop Florence's expansion. The defensive impact is obvious: the bay on which the guards walked the rounds is still intact (and can be travelled every day between 10.00 AM and 8.00 PM). Today, 12 of those 14 towers are still standing, two were destroyed during the Second World War.

Odd facts. Only 42 people live between these walls year-round; the borough is rich with handicrafts shops: in Piazza Roma there is the Bottega di Anna (Anna's shop), with embroidered tablecloths and hand woven baskets, it stays open also for evenings of tasting (olive oil and Grigioni wines) and music.

Buonconvento. In the area that marks the confluence between the Arbia and the Ombrone, Buonconvento is, historically, a place of meetings, clashes and exchanges. The rectangular map of the city is delimited by surrounding walls, the façade of the Municipal Palace shows the 25 coat of arms of the Podestà, who governed the borough until 1270.Buonconvento, with Asciano, Monteroni d'Arbia, Rapolano Terme and San Giovanni d'Assio, is the land of clay.

SHARE THIS ARTICLE
COMMENT ON THIS ARTICLE

 

See all Travel Articles >>

 

JOIN OUR NEWSLETTER
Receive weekly giveaways and updates from
our blogs and premium online content.